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Ten Plus One Questions with Author Andy Peloquin

Author AnAndy Peloquindy Peloquin is one of those men that seems to have been writing his entire life. You will get a sense in that just from the first answer to the questions below. He is the man who brought us the great book Blade of the Destroyer and has written about 8,000 articles. To think he’s only in his 20’s says a lot about his dedication. So see how he answers the questions below.

 

Question 1: When did you realize first wanted to be a writer?

I discovered my talent for writing around the age of 10 or 11. I had a teacher who was passionate about science and literature. His love of reading and writing rubbed off on me, and I have been writing ever since.

I write off and on until the age of 19 or 20, when I took a five-year hiatus. I published my very first book in March 2014, and I’ve been addicted to creating ever since!

Question 2:  How did your friends/family take the loss of your time as you wrote the book?

My wife was very supportive–and still is to this day. I spent a lot of my Christmas/New Year holiday writing, and seeing as she was working (from home, thank the gods!), it wasn’t a big problem. As for how my kids take it, you’ll have to ask them. I know there are times when they wish I wasn’t working (so I could drive them places), but so far it hasn’t been a huge problem.

Question 3: What inspired you to write Blade of the Destroyer?

After reading books by Joe Abercrombie, Brent Weeks, and Scott Lynch, I fell in love with anti-heroes and the darker underbelly of fantasy societies. I’ve always loved stories about assassins, thieves, and rogues, and it just felt natural to write one myself. There just aren’t enough good fantasy assassin stories!

Question 4: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters?

The idea came to me in stages:

The creation of the “legendary assassin” started out as a short piece of prose I wrote years ago. In the piece, a terrified man tries to escape a monster hunting him. It’s this inexorable, implacable creature that kills him in the end.

When I started writing in 2013, I read over some of my older works and found that piece. The story just kind of grew from there–with the monster becoming a half-demon assassin. He is still implacable and inexorable, but more man and less monster.

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books?

My favorite birthday gift to this day is still “The Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes”. I read that book so many times before I had to give it away. Edgar Rice Burroughs’ John Carter series got me hooked on science fiction and fantasy.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book?

It was such a dream come true. To feel the pages turn in my hands, to see the AMAZING cover (done by my ultra-talented sister), and to inhale that “new book” smell–it was awesome. Even now, days later, I can’t stop smiling every time I see it on my desk or see my kids reading it.

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre?

I’m going to stick with dark fantasy for now. I love to explore the darker depths of human nature, so my books will be more focused on what monsters people are, rather than real monsters.

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book?

Anyone who is interested in a gripping character, an intriguing story, and a bit of darkness. Epic fantasy readers may not like my less-than-happy endings, but I think they’ll be satisfied with them. The story is a rich, vivid, and graphic one that will paint a VERY clear picture in the readers’ heads. Definitely worth picking up!

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book?

Be prepared for A LOT of hard work. It’s amazingly fun to write that story, but that’s all the fun you get. From there, it’s hard work re-drafting, editing, implementing critiques and feedback from beta readers, and more. But it will all be worth it when you have a finished product you can be proud of.

Question 10: When not writing how do you like to spend your time?

I’m a HUGE comic book geek, and I stay pretty up to date with the latest from the Marvel Universe. I also watch TV, hit the gym, read, spend time with my kids, and play video games. I’m a down to earth kind of guy!

The + 1 Question

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

I would LOVE to go back to Japan on a book tour. I was born and raised there, leaving at the age of 14, and it would be wonderful to visit. I plan to do so at some point in my life, but being able to have an all-expenses-paid trip for a book tour would be twice the AWESOME.

 

Where to find him online:

Andy Peloquin

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Posted by on September 2, 2015 in Interview

 

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Ten +1 Questions with Author John Hazen

John HazenJohn Hazen is the author behind the book Dear Dad. He took time to answer the new set of Ten +1 Questions that I have put together. So without more comment please check out John’s answers to the questions.

Question 1: When did you realize first wanted to be a writer? 

I can’t remember when I didn’t want to write novels, but it was always one of those things I “never got around to do”. I put forward a couple of efforts earlier in my life but they never went anywhere. Every time I did it all seemed so daunting and overwhelming, but it still didn’t dampen my dream of writing a book, someday. It wasn’t until I got myself my first laptop that I started to get serious about it and began to put my ideas down and fashion them into stories. The result is that I’ve now written four novels, one of which I self-published (Dear Dad) and two that have been published by a small independent publisher, Black Rose Writing (Fava and Journey of an American Son).

Question 2: How did your friends/family take the loss of your time as you wrote the book?

Most of my writing is done on the train back and forth from work or early in the morning hours so there hasn’t been a lot of lost time away from friends and family.

Question 3: What inspired you to write Dear Dad? 

I’ve always been a bit of a history buff and have especially been fascinated by the Civil War. Many people at the time viewed the Civil War as a just war that needed to be fought. Juxtaposed with this is the fact that I grew up in the Vietnam War era with the nightly televised antiwar protest images being pumped into my brain. I thought it would make for a great novel to somehow contrast the two wars (with a nod being given to World War II in the process), but I’m a novelist and I didn’t want it to come off as a dry history lesson. That’s when it occurred to me that what better way to compare the wars than to have to same person participate in both wars?

Question 4: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters?

When I get an initial idea for a book, I can’t say that there is very much in the way of specifics. I have a general concept of what the book is about (e.g., comparing two very dissimilar wars or what would happen if a person who lost someone on 9/11 was suddenly able to extract ultimate revenge), where I ultimately want to end up and perhaps the lead characters but beyond that, the rest comes to me as I write. I have great admiration for those authors who can outline their books ahead of time. Me, I make it up as I go along. I always tell people that some of my favorite characters are minor characters that I originally introduce to help move the plot along but then as I’m writing they grow in importance and become pivotal characters in the book. In Dear Dad, Doc and Jon were that way. I just love the way these characters develop before my very eyes.

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books? 

Would it be going back a little too far to cite Virginia Lee Burton who wrote Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel as a profound influence? It’s the first book I recall reading. Seriously, my favorite all-time book is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. I read it first in either Junior High or High School and I’ve re-read it a number of times since then. In high school and for years afterward I would latch onto an author and read everything I could by him or her one after the other. I did that with John Steinbeck, James Mitchener and Robert Ludlum. As you can see, my tastes are rather eclectic.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book? 

It was quite a rush, I must say; quite a feeling of accomplishment and pride. I must say that even now I look back at my books and say to myself: ‘Wow, I did that?’

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre? 

Oh yes, I’m still writing. I write in the suspense/thriller genre. All my books have some sort of historical component but I like to have some sort of twist. Dear Dad, for example, has a time travel component to it. Presently, I’m working on revamping the first novel I ever wrote but was never released. It’s called Aceldama and has a fantasy aspect to it, asking the question: What if someone were to stumble across one of the thirty pieces of silver given to Judas to betray Christ?

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book? 

I’m hoping that Dear Dad has an appeal to a broad spectrum of people. I could see history buffs liking it. I could see the time travel crowd having an interest. I can the family-values set taking a look at it because of the father-son bond you mention in your review. Most importantly (and I want this to apply to all my books), I see people being attracted to the book because they just plain like to read a good story.

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book? 

Perseverance. You can’t let yourself be overwhelmed at the outset but construct it as you would if you’re building a house. Just like you wouldn’t start doing your interior decorating until you got the structure and plumbing and electrical in place, neither should you rush the building of your story. Don’t get ahead of yourself but put the book together bit by bit and scene by scene. You also need to have a thick skin and accept constructive criticism gracefully. In Dear Dad, for example, an early draft had a whole family that one of my readers said really did not add much to the story and in fact distracted the reader from the main plotline. I really liked the family and I miss those kids, but I had to agree and they were expunged from the final version of the book. Lastly there’s an old writer adage that I think writers should always keep in mind: ‘Show, don’t tell’. The example I remember is instead of saying ‘Ted was filthy rich’ say ‘Ted glanced at his Rolex’. It gets the same point across but in a more descriptive way that helps the reader paint a picture in his mind

Question 10: When not writing how does you like to spend your time? 

I just like spending time with my wife of 35 years, my best friend, Lynn. We love to travel and play tennis but more likely than not we’ll just enjoy each other’s company doing about anything.

The + 1 Question

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

I’d love to retrace the trip my grandfather made in 1920 when he was sent on a business trip from Boston to Calcutta, India. He wrote a diary of that trip which I subsequently used as the setting into which I wrote my most recent novel, Journey of an American Son (how’s that for a shameless plug for one of my other books?) As you can imagine, a trip that today would take less than a day at that time took months as he took a train across Canada, then steamers to Tokyo, Singapore and ultimately Calcutta. Along the way he also rode on rickshaws, dinghies and Model Ts. After he concluded his business, he got back on trains and steamers but headed west to go through the Suez Canal up through Europe and then across the Atlantic back to Boston. Now that would be a book tour!

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Posted by on July 1, 2015 in Interview

 

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Ten plus One Questions with Author Rosanne Dingli

Rosanne DingliRosanne Dingli is a native of the small island country of Malta.  She was living in Malta at the time the country became its own country after becoming independent in 1964, and immigrated to Australia in 1982. She got a great education and is able to speak three languages and has had a variety of jobs. She has been a teacher, lecturer, and numerous other jobs but writing is one role she has done well. She has written multiple novels, collections of short stories and some poetry. As a person reads her first novel Death in Malta you will see how much she loved her native Malta and her new home Australia.

Now on to her responses to the Ten Plus One Questions:

 

Question 1: What inspired you to write Death in Malta?

I knew my first novel had to be atmospheric and meaningful – so something about my birthplace was ideal. What better than a Mediterranean island full of history, secrets, and engaging characters? My protagonist is an Australian novelist, so seen through his eyes I could portray the island just as I remembered it, set sometime in the seventies or eighties, perhaps. I used nostalgia, history, and the magic of authentic locations to pull the reader in.

Question 2: Is there any significance to the name names of your main characters?

I always think very carefully about names – it’s important to have good memorable ones, that are not too ordinary, and yet not too strange. The meaning is usually abstract: complicated or complex, historic, or related to something about their features. They must also be authentically linked to the location.

Question 3: During the writing process did you find yourself thinking about any of your memories?

My memories of historic locations, yes. I rarely, however, include anything private or intimate such as my life events or particular feelings, even if my writing triggers memories. I find that my imagination is enough to conjure up a good story. Having said that, however: authors cannot escape their own particular way of composing a story out of what they know and understand intimately.

Question 4: What were some of your favorite books growing up?

I liked the novels of John Dickson Carr, Daphne DuMaurier, Georgette Heyer and John Fowles. And do you know what – I still do. But I have added a great number of others since my youth. I particularly like AS Byatt, Annie Proulx, Robert Goddard and Ian McEwan.

Question 5: Do you hear from fans of your books, and if you do what do they say?

Yes – social media makes sure that my readers follow me and make comments and observations, which I find can be either very helpful and flattering, or sometimes a bit too close for comfort. But there are ways of avoiding conflict or disagreement. Any contact is seen as friendly, and I welcome it.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the very first printed version of your book?

I can’t remember, because it’s a long time ago. Death in Malta was my first novel (2001) but it certainly was not my first book. My collected published and awarded poems came out in 1991, and I also edited a collection for the centenary of a Western Australian country town. Since 1985, individual pieces of mine have appeared in anthologies, literary supplements, magazines and journals all over Australia and on the internet, so being in print was a known feeling by the time my first novel was published. Mind you, receiving a box of books is always a good feeling – I’ve just opened five new ones, with copies of five of my books, so my hallway is now full of my writing.

Question 7: Do you continue to write?

I am now a full-time writer. Most people know that authors have to supplement their income with other jobs, so since 1985 I have worked as editor, lecturer, teacher, heraldic artist, graphic artist, EIC, travel consultant, cook, and more. Since giving up teaching in 2008, I have managed about a book a year. 2015 will see publication of my fifth novel.

Question 8: What is the message you want people to take away from the book?

I do not weave messages into my fiction. There is always a main premise, of course, which I hope readers pick up as they go, and there is always enough ambiguity in my main premise for readers to fill it with their own concepts. People always put their own meanings into ambiguity. I find that an excellent thing, because they invariably come back for more of my work, because they feel they can relate to it.

Question 9: If you could envision a future for your main character, what would it be?

I rarely do this. It’s up to the reader to concoct and imagine one. Most of my protagonists are men, who would probably go one with much of the same as in the novels and stories I write. According to Luke, my second novel, brings my only female protagonist to my readers. I think I might bring her back in another, so she does have a future. There is a supporting character in my second novel which returns in my fourth. He might even come back a third time, but I do not think of it as his future.
Question 10: Who are those in the dedication of the book, and their importance to you?

I nearly always dedicate my novels to my husband, because he is my first reader and most avid fan.

 

The + 1 Question:

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

I love Venice, and it would be fascinating to have a book tour there, even though it’s highly unlikely, since all my books are in English and getting them translated is a very difficult task. Even though I speak good Italian, translating is a specialist undertaking. Venice is a city I have returned to many times, and I’ve used it as a location in much of my writing. It has a particular atmosphere, and the people are quite unique.

 

 

ROSANNE DINGLI
Author of The Hidden Auditorium,
Camera Obscura, According to Luke, Death in Malta,

Counting Churches – The Malta Stories, The Day of the Bird,

The Astronomer’s Pig, Making a Name, The Bookbinder’s Brother,
and All the Wrong Places
http://www.rosannedingli.com
http://rosannedingli.blogspot.com

 
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Posted by on September 16, 2014 in Interview

 

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Ten Plus One Questions with Author Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli

RitaAuthor Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli is an author that calls Sardinia, Italy, home. She has quite a full plate of activities as she is involved in things from web development, biologist, writer, and so much more. It’s actually surprising that she had time to write Red Desert Point of No Return but we are fortunate writing is one of her many talents. You can find more about her in her English site at Anakina on blogspot.com. You can find her on Twitter and Facebook as well. Her home site is found here.

 

Question 1: What inspired you to write Red Desert – Point of No Return?

It was autumn 2011. I was completing the first draft of my very first novel, which I’m finally going to publish in November (in Italian), and at that time I was reading a novel by Robert Zubrin (the founder of the Mars Society) titled “First Landing”, which was about Mars manned exploration and colonisation. In the same period there was the launch of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover. So in general it was a period in which I was keeping myself interested with Mars. Just after “First Landing”, I read “The Case for Mars” (non-fiction) by Zubrin. Then I completed that first draft, it was December, and I was looking for an idea for a short story or a novella that I wanted to publish on Amazon KDP, which had just arrived to Italy, just to try this publishing platform.

And there it was when an image appeared in my mind. There was an astronaut driving alone in the Martian desert. I didn’t know whether that was a man or a woman. He/she had a limited oxygen supply and I was wondering what he/she was doing there alone. That was when I started imagining the story of the Red Desert series; “Point of No Return” is just the first book of four.

My intention was to write a series of novellas, but then the story grew so much that the other books became novels (the third and fourth ones are quite long novels).

“Point of No Return” isn’t exactly the beginning of the story, actually it is in the middle of it. The whole series is written in a non-chronological order.

Question 2: Is there any significance to the name names of your main characters?

Not the name but the initial. Most main characters (protagonist or co-protagonist) on my books have a name starting with A, like my nickname Anakina. So the protagonist of “Red Desert” is called Anna Persson (she is Swedish).

Don’t ask me why I do like that. I really don’t know!

Question 3: During the writing process did you find yourself thinking about any of your memories?

Of course yes. I continuously take inspiration from my memories. The “write what you know” rule definitely applies here but in a more general meaning then most may think. There is a bit of me, my memories, my life in all characters. Sometimes it’s the memory of a place, or of a particular feeling, or of someone I know. Some experiences or features of many characters are taken from real people I have met in my life, sometimes just for one day.

I take all my memories, whether they are coming from real experiences or from those coming from books I’ve read or films/TV series I’ve watched, and I freely use them in my books.

For instance, when a character stands by the sea and I have to describe what they feel (what they can heard, smell, touch, but also their emotions), I just use my own memories regarding a similar situation but at the same time I identify with the character, so I adapt what I remember to the situation narrated in the book.

Question 4: What were some of your favorite books growing up?

I remember that when I was a child I read “Momo” by Michael Ende. That book really affected me. It was about some entities stealing time from your life without you even noticing it. That was scary considering my age, but I still consider the idea quite scary even now. That was the very first book I couldn’t put down until I had finished it.

I also read a lot of novels by Agatha Christie when I was a teenager. I loved them.

Question 5: Do you hear from fans of the book, and if you do what do they say?

Fortunately, my books sell quite well in Italy and I’m continuously in touch with my readers mostly on Facebook and Twitter, many of them have written to me privately. Well, they say a lot of different things. What I like most is when they tell me that after reading the series they had the impression to have learnt something about Mars and space exploration in general. There was a reader who thanked me because my series made him get interested about space exploration again after a long time.

I also like when female readers contact me. Most of them are not into science fiction normally and they are happy to have given a try to my books because they made them discover a new genre.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the very first printed version of your book?

Actually I published my first printed book only on December 2013. It was an omnibus of the Red Desert series. I did it because my readers asked for it. They wanted to have a hard copy of the series and possibly to be able to give it as gift for Christmas.

Personally I wasn’t particularly thrilled. The book for me is what’s inside not the hard thing.

Instead, a great moment was when I first saw the Italian version of “Point of No Return” on the Kindle Store and definitely when I received the very first review.

Question 7: Do you continue to write?

Of course! After the Red Desert series, which I have written in Italian between 2012 and 2013, I’ve already published another novel, a crime thriller titled “Il mentore” (The Mentor), on May. My next novel will be published on November 2014. I’m currently writing the third draft. This is the novel I’ve been writing back in 2011. It’s titled “L’isola di Gaia” (The Isle of Gaia) and it’s in the same universe of the Red Desert series.

One day they will be hopefully published in English, too.

Moreover I wrote an action thriller in 2013 (during NaNoWriMo), which I’ll publish in 2015. I’m planning to write more books in the very next future. It’s my intention to publish at least two books per year in Italian.

Question 8: What is the message you are want people to take away from the book?

I don’t like books with a morale. I don’t feel I have any title to send a message. The main topic of my books is the subjectivity of good and evil. There aren’t real heroes or villains in my stories. All characters are in a kind of shadow zone. Good is what the character holding the point of view in a specific scene thinks is good for them. You tend to find yourself agreeing with them, in most cases, even if what they think may be morally bad in real life.

The only “message” of my books is the absence of a real message. Everybody is right and wrong at the same time. I always keep a neutral position so as each reader is able to choose what they prefer, their own message.

It’s a way of showing the importance of differences and the need to respect them, to see the good and the bad in each of them without any general judgement.

Question 9: If you could envision a future for your main character, what would it be?

I perfectly know the future of Anna Persson, but I really can’t say anything about it. As I’ve mentioned earlier, I’m going to publish another book in the same universe of the series. Actually the Red Desert series is the first part of a bigger saga called “Aurora”. It will include “The Isle of Gaia” and three more novels I’m going to publish by 2020. Their titles will be “Ophir”, “Sirius”, and “Aurora. Although Anna is the main character of the entire Red Desert series, the other books of the saga will have different protagonists. Anyway Anna will be definitely involved until the end of the saga. So, sorry, I can’t say what will happen to her!
Question 10: Who are those in the dedication of the book, and their importance to you?

Actually, there’s no dedication in my books, but there are some important acknowledges in the end matter. Beside the people working in my publishing team (test readers, beta readers, proofreaders, translation revisers for the English version and so on), I had to thank my partner Federico, who is continuously supporting me in this publishing adventure, and of course my parents, who became science fiction fans just for me.

 

The + 1 Question: If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

Just one? That’s difficult.
One of the place I would love to go for a book tour, or just for tourism, is Australia. I don’t know why. I’ve never been there and it’s so far, so I’m curious to go there. I love travelling, I love visiting any place that I haven’t visited before (and even some places I have already visited), I love to learn about life and people there. I would spend all my life travelling if I had the chance.
A big dream of mine is to go cruising along the Antarctic Peninsula, but I doubt I can do a book tour there!

 

 
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Posted by on July 14, 2014 in Interview

 

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Ten Plus One Questions with Author Monica Pierce

Monica PierceMonica Pierce is the author behind the book Famine Book one of The Apocalytics. She is a self published author who calls the eclectic city of Seatle, Washington, her home. Her personal web page will tell you a bit about her including things like how she has two rock ’em” sockem cat bots. Those are her words, not mine. It just shows the woman has some humor, showed through in Famine.  Her personal website even has some nice photos that reprsent the characters of the book which you can check out here. So, without more fan fare and blabber, text from me, here are her answers to the Ten Plus One Questions.

Question 1:

What inspired you to write Famine?

Ha! That’s a long story, so I’ll give you the Cliff Notes version. I wanted to create something that was paranormal, but didn’t include the usual suspects (ie. vampires, werewolves, angels/demons, etc.). Famine grew out of a much earlier concept that was vampire-based, but I couldn’t make the story work; it just wasn’t unique enough for me. So after a little research and “what if-ing” I hit upon the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and everything just clicked into place.

Question 2:

Is there any significance to the name names of your main characters?

Besides finding a name that “fit” my main character (I knew it when I heard it), I needed one that could span a 1,500-year period. He is addressed as either Bartholomew or Bartholomeus, and having the Latin version allows me to quickly indicate the kind of relationship he has with various characters.

Question 3:

During the writing process did you find yourself thinking about any of your memories?

Specific memories, no, but the relationship between Bartholomew and Matilde as she grows up was influenced by the relationship I had with my own father. He wasn’t always easy on me, but he was always fair and honest. He wanted me to be strong and independent, and I’m grateful that he didn’t let me slide.

Question 4:

What were some of your favorite books growing up?

As a teen: Watership Down (I still have my tattered original copy), Jane Eyre, the Dragonriders of Pern series (my brothers and I traded these); pre-teen: Judy Blume’s books, the Ramona books, fairytales (my mother a beautifully illustrated book of Grimm’s Fairytales)

Question 5:

Do you hear from fans of the book, and if you do what do they say?

I’m so gratified by the generous feedback I’ve been getting! Readers love Bartholomew, though he’s a true anti-hero. They appreciate that his decisions are based upon his love for the people around him and his determination to stop the Four Horsemen. Readers also admire Matilde’s strength (and the fact that she’s not whiny or spoiled. LOL!), they’ve been talking about the richness of my world-building, and they appreciate the relationships between all of the characters. The slow unfolding of Bartholomew’s history and the growth of his relationship with Matilde as he raises her from child- to adulthood. Really, I’ve had such wonderful responses. 😀

Question 6:

What was the feeling like when you saw the very first printed version of your book?

Delight and satisfaction in a design well-executed. I’m self-published, so I worked with a photographer, models, and a cover designer, and I did the inside layout myself. Seeing the design all come together to create a visual experience for readers is always incredibly satisfying.


Question 7:

Do you continue to write?

Absolutely and every day. I’m working on a sequel to Girl Under Glass (my first novel), as well as plotting Death, the second book in the Apocalyptics series.

Question 8:

What is the message you are want people to take away from the book?

To never give up and to love yourself. Those themes come up a lot in my work.

Question 9:

If you could envision a future for your main character, what would it be?

I’d let Bartholomew retire to a nice little house on a large piece of property outside of Seattle. He’d have a view of Puget Sound and the mountains, horses to ride, and a large garden to tend. And he’d be happiest when Matilde came to visit.

Question 10:
Who are those in the dedication of the book, and their importance to you?

The book is dedicated to my father, whose huge heart is buried beneath a gruff exterior. I put a great deal of my dad into Bartholomew, and this book is about tough fathers and their strong daughters.

The + 1 Question:

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

With unlimited funds, I’m assuming. I’d find a big old castle on the Rhine and fly in all my readers to talk and laugh, take long walks and eat too many pastries.

Find more about Monica, and her books through the below links.

Monica Enderle Pierce, author
Famine is now available for KindleNookKobo, and in print
Girl Under Glass is now available for Kindle and Nook
Visit my website: monicaenderlepierce.com
Follow me on FacebookTwitterGoodreads, and Pinterest
 
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Posted by on June 12, 2014 in Interview

 

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Audio Interview with Authors Anne Montgomery and Randi Zohr

AudioWelcome to what is going to be a new feature here on the blog. It is the inaugural voice interview with authors who had their books featured. This first audio interview features authors Anne Montgomery and Randi Zohr. The original interview was about 30 minutes but to help those checking it out I have cut it down to the 6 pieces you see below. Take a listen to what you want to hear as we discuss several topics.

If you have feedback on this feature you want to share please do not hesitate to contact me.

Email me at Knightmist72@gmail.com

 

 

Things such as:

  • Their books The Magician and Confessions of a Cyber Slut
  • The importance of characters and experience.
  • Amtrack
  • Allure of fiction and writing tips.
  • Teachers
  • What a bubbler is and is it pop or soda.

 

Part One

Meet the authors and learn about their books, and put a voice to a name.

 

Part Two

Characters and importance of more than one and allure of Fiction.

Part Three

Writer suggestions and getting out there.

Part Four

Teachers and a gaining of understanding the things you did not know, and finding time.

Part Five

Reading and dyslexia each have an impact, along with how mothers like to spell check.

Part Six

A goodbye but first question about their bucket list.

 
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Posted by on April 28, 2014 in Interview

 

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Ten +1 Questions with Author Anne Montgomery

Anne MontgomeryIf the name Anne Montgomery seems familiar to anyone it could be that she has had quite the career.  The place many might remember her name from is her time on ESPN’s Sportscenter being one of the first woman anchors. She has worked for the NBA’s Phoenix Suns as a studio host as well.

She now has turned to writing and is also a teacher. Another interesting fact is that she has a thing for zebra stripes. What do I mean, well she referees High School Football games.  So now that you have a brief background here are those questions on her book The Magician from Musa Publishing.

 

Question 1: What inspired you to write The Magician?

I was commissioned to write a magazine article about ancient ballcourts. People in Central and South America were playing a ballgame when Columbus arrived, and he was fascinated by the contest, which resembled modern-day ice hockey or basketball. While visiting a northern Arizona ruinthat had a ballcourt, the archeologist I was interviewing pointed up the hillside and said, “That’s where The Magician was buried.” I later wrote a magazine article about the man they call The Magician, in which I was tasked with uncovering where he might have come from, since he was different from the people who buried him in a fabulous tomb 900 years ago. The research entailed learning about pottery and weapons and trade routes and textiles, the ancestors of the Hopi, the art of pueblo building, ancient farming practices, and – believe it or not – sword swallowing. The reporter in me loved the research.

 

Question 2: Is there any significance to the name names of your main characters?

Kate Butler is my alter ego. My surname is Butler. (A TV station made me change my name because I anchored with another woman who had the last name Butler, which, of course, wasn’t her real name either.) My first name comes from Latin and means “grace,” and this is one of those cosmic ironies. I have bad feet, and while I’ve done pretty well at sports where I don’t have to run – swimming, skiing, ice skating – I have a tendency to trip and fall over cracks in the sidewalk. In my early years, this resulted in a lot of family eye rolling. My mother was often heard to remark that she wished she’d called me Kate instead of Anne.

 

Question 3: During the writing process did you find yourself thinking about any of your memories?

The present day story of The Magician is pretty much true. Kate struggles to get the story done in exactly the same way I did. Kate learned and grew along the way, and so did I.

 

Question 4: What were some of your favorite books growing up?

I hated to read when I was a kid. I now know that I am a bit dyslexic, which made school and reading difficult. Back then I was called stupid and lazy, which made me resent most anything with words. Even when I was in college, my mother would correct any letters I wrote home – yes, way back when we put actual stamps on mail – and she would return them with all of my mistakes marked in red pen. Books held no allure.

I recently got an e-mail from a woman who was my best friend when I was growing up which said, “Who would have ever thought you would be a writer.” She read constantly. I didn’t read a book for pleasure until I was 18. It was The Once and Future King by T.H. White. It remains one of my favorites.

 

Question 5: Do you hear from fans of the book, and if you do what do they say?

            The Magician has only been out a couple of months, so I’m still waiting. Patiently.

 

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the very first printed version of your book?

Um…it’s an e-book. So I have nothing to feel accept the screen of my Kindle.

 

Question 7: Do you continue to write?

I am working on a novel based on the polygamous towns of Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah, which together are called Short Creek. Warren Jeffs is still running the community from prison. I have visited the area – pretending that I had no idea where I was – and interviewed people that have been involved with the cult members. It’s all pretty awful. I have to put the book away sometimes, because what’s happening up there is so depressing. I’m telling the story through the eyes of a young girl and doing my best to give the child and the readers hope.

 

Question 8: What is the message you want people to take away from the book?

First, I want the readers to understand that human beings haven’t changed all that much over the centuries. We all want to be accepted for who we are. We want love and security.

I also want the readers to realize that we need to put an end to archeological looting all over the world. I’ll let the archeologist in my story, Dr. Jerrod Crane, explain: “Once you’ve moved an artifact from its setting, you’ve destroyed its sense of time and place, something you can never get back. Dig up a pot and drop it on the surface, and we’ve lost any perspective of its significance historically. So what you have is a pretty piece with no meaning.”

Finally, I’d like historians to admit that our beliefs about the way man populated the earth need to be updated. Let’s look into those gaps in the historical record and the apparent anomalies with open minds.

 

Question 9: If you could envision a future for your main character, what would it be?

Kate will become comfortable without being on television. The girl has a massive ego. (I should know.) She will learn that a job is what we do, not who we are.

 

Question 10: Who are those in the dedication of the book, and their importance to you?

Ryan Pickard is my boyfriend. (Yes, a really silly word, for someone my age.) We have been together 20 years. As it says in the dedication, he loves history as much as I do and we often do verbal battle in regard to historical issues, making never to be paid dollar bets on the outcome. We are polar opposites in some things – like religion and politics – still we laugh and argue and never get bored with each other. He has also been a great sport about accompanying me on my research trips. He is adored by dogs and little children and is an exemplary chef. And we both love football and scuba diving. What more could a girl ask for?

 

The + 1 Question: If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

This one is tough. I have been fortunate in that I have traveled extensively. That said, I especially love Australia. Ryan and I attended the Australian Mineral Symposium in Perth in 2005. I’m a rock collector, so we went mining with a group of Aussi “rockers” and brought back about 75 pounds of rocks in our suitcases. It was fabulous. They made us feel like family. So, I think I’d like to go back.

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2014 in Interview

 

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