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Author Interview with Doug Lamoreux

I do have a normal Ten + 1 Question I ask an author about their book and process but for Sauy Jacky I decided it needed it’s own set of questions for Author Doug Lamoreux.  I also felt that since I have reviewed several of Doug’s books in the past he was due a new set of questions as well. As always, when the author does the review all I do is copy and paste to the blog editor to post. I DO NOT edit for spelling, grammar, or anything else. I am in no way saying there are issues, as normally those are my issues, but want it clear these are the author’s words. So, without further comment………………………………….

Question 1: What was the driving force to write the book, Saucy Jacky?

A big project had fallen through and a solid draft of a manuscript had to be shelved. Six months of writing time had been wasted and I was more than a little angry about it. I funneled that anger into an idea I had been kicking around for a very long time; the possibility of telling the London Ripper murders of 1888 from the killer’s point of view. I started writing – found Jack’s voice immediately – and the novel took off.

Question 2: How did your friends/family react when you stated you were writing about Jack the Ripper?

I don’t, as a rule, discuss ‘works in progress’ in any detail at all. I save the detail for the work. Family and friends rarely ask what I’m working on and usually only get one or two sentences in reply. In this case, it went something like this: “I’m writing the Whitechapel murders from Jack the Ripper’s point of view.” Followed by silence. Followed by a hesitant, “Oh, yeah?” That was the extent of it. With the exception of one good friend (and his wife), who were deeply interested and very excited. They wanted details and often inquired how it was going and repeatedly asked when it would be finished. The novel is dedicated to both.

Question 3: During the initial writing process how was it to work with Ripperologists?

When I’m writing a solo novel, I don’t work with anybody. I made an intense study of the works of numerous ripperologists before the writing began. Then I had to make solid decisions as to which direction I would take my story. No one knows who Jack the Ripper was (despite fierce assertions to the contrary). There are many ‘official’ suspects and staunch advocates in every camp. I pushed aside all the ‘usual suspects’ for what I thought was a simpler and more likely explanation: he was a complete nobody – which made him very interesting indeed.

Question 4: What were some of the Newspapers, or journalists, from the period you recall had some great information on Jack? 

I name them in the novel; over a dozen different papers (with many journalists) covering the crimes. All had great information and, some, misinformation, to inform, amuse, and annoy Saucy Jacky – who must have been reading about his work on a daily basis.

Question 5: What are you working on now? What Genre?

I have four or five novels started and in various stages. All in the horror or mystery genres, save one. None has caught fire in my imagination yet.

Question 6: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book? 

Saucy Jacky is a historical horror novel. It pulls no punches in regards to the atrocities committed, neither does it gratuitously exploit them. It is exactly what it claims to be: The Whitechapel Murders as told by Jack the Ripper. The reader goes with the killer to his place of legitimate employment, on the job when he commits his murders, and back home again (every moment inside his head). It is sometimes grim, but it is also – I think – very entertaining and oddly amusing at times. All sorts of very nice, perfectly reasonable adults read and enjoy well-written horror and suspense. But it is for adults. 

Question 7: Do you expect any reaction from those who call themselves Ripperologists?

Not particularly. I know many have a copy and have added it to their reading piles, but those are often tall piles. There are a lot of ripper scholars with many points of view. Some don’t bother with fiction at all. They are serious students of historical crime and punishment. Of those that do read novels, I have the same hope I have for all my readers – they find something entertaining about my presentation. We’ll see. (For a lark, I added a few ‘Easter eggs’ for ripperologists; my Saucy Jacky encounters a number of famous historical ‘suspects’ in passing as he moves through London’s East End. The average reader won’t notice a thing.)

Question 8: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book, based on a historical figure?

I never give writing advice – to anyone. Good writers don’t need it. Bad writers won’t take it. I’ll just say: If you’re writing a grocery list, know what you want to eat. If you’re writing a historical novel, know your history. Then all you need do is sit down and write. If you do it long enough, you’ll get good at it. That’s the extent of my advise.

Question 9: When not writing how do you like to spend your time?  

I read – a lot. All good writers read – a lot. And I collect and watch old films, horror films, thrillers, westerns, you name it. I disappear into the past.

Question 10: Any plans for future romps into historical fiction? 

It’s always possible. I’ve written several (Saucy Jacky, 1888; Dracula’s Demeter, 1897) and love the writing and love the research. It’s always possible.

The 11th Question: Any thoughts on who you think Jack may have been? 

All kinds of thoughts. We could talk forever regarding who he ‘might’ have been. But I am open-minded on the subject. I have no convictions and, in truth, I have no real idea.

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2019 in Interview

 

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Saucy Jacky by Author Doug Lamoreux

The name Jack the Ripper still will bring interest to the mines of individuals today, as much as it did when he committed the murders that made him famous, back in 1888.  The man would send fear across a city, if not a country, not just for the murders but the brutality of those murders. The fact after so many decades, no over a century, and there is still debate on who he was can be considered astounding. There have been plenty of television shows, movies, books, and other mediums of entertainment that have covered the man. We now to get to take a very different look at him thru the mind of author Doug Lamoreux in his book, Saucy Jacky.

Saucy Jacky will take the reader into not the gruesome crimes that where committed but dare I write this mind and what drove him.  I will warn readers with squeamish stomachs Lamoreux did his research for this book. He does not spare any details on how Jack’s victims met their ends. I will also remind potential readers the book takes place in the late 1800s in London, England. A period that saw high immigration, large unemployment, and even some racial/ethnic divides.  These could be prevalent in the Whitechapel district of London where the Ripper committed much of his murders.

The book opens as Jack himself is describing the sensation he, and his victim, felt as he proceeded to stab her for the first time. Yes, you read that right the book opens as Jack describes how is going about killing his first victim. Sharing with the reader his thought processes, where he got the knife, and even correcting himself as he tells the tale. He will even go as far as to promise to name himself at some point, but for now, he is Mr. ___.

Readers will get a taste of the man behind the knife, and those crimes as you continue to read the book. I will say that I am being a bit vague as I do not wish to give too much of the book away.  I will just note that as you read there will be many pieces of information that will be touched on regarding Jack.

You will discover how his lodgings will play a big part in his crimes. All I will allude to here, is you have to ask yourself how can living above a now-shuttered shoe store help Jack. Mrs. Griggs, who is his landlady, will be just as helpful due to her love of sharing the daily news with Jack.  A woman who is politically active who leads a group of women who call themselves Dress Reformists will all come into play in helping Jack.

There are also those individuals he works alongside in his daily job. A job that leads him to hear some great gossip from a female co-worker who is dating a policeman. This co-worker will give Jack a behind the headlines account of what the police are doing to try and capture the killer.

Saucy Jacky will go into great details on what potentially may have driven the man to commit such atrocities to these women of Whitechapel. You will learn why he selected these women, and how he was influenced by his upbringing. The interesting pieces are also what drove him to write his infamous notes to the newspapers, and police. There will be some real genius in how those were done and how, if true, would have really thrown the police off in that period. Something, for the reader, to discover as they read the book.

There will be many other insights into what may have been the mind of Jack throughout the book. As he learns about the police activities, he will share his thoughts on those coppers.  There will be vigilante groups created to also capture him, and one of their leaders will get a “special” gift sent to him. There, of course, will be his commentary on the Dress Reformist meetings as well. The biggest insights will come as we get to read his reactions to how the press, during the period, covered his crimes. We will also get a sense of how he felt having the name Leather Apron given to him, and what drove him to really name himself.

Saucy Jacky is of course based on what author Doug Lamoreux gained from the research he did for this book. He involved Ripperologists, those past newspapers, their journalists and so many others he thanks in his acknowledgments. The one thing is clear if any of the thought processes utilized within this story are true to the real Jack, well it’s no surprise he was never found.

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2019 in Reviews

 

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Obsidian Tears by Doug Lamoreux & Daniel D. Lamoreux

Yellowstone National Park is United States staple that attracts thousands, if not more, visitors each and every year. People enjoy not just the beauty of the Old Faithful Geyser but also the natural beauty that abounds the park itself. The one thing that many visitors, and maybe even some staff, do not know is the large history behind the land the park is located on.  The history includes that of the Native American’s and obsidian made artifacts have been found in the park. Why do I bring this up? I mention the obsidian as it is part of the title of the book, Obsidian Tears. The book is written by brothers Daniel and Doug Lamoreux and that deep black, glassy rock will play its part in this book.

Obsidian Tears will introduce the reader to Chief Forest Ranger Glenn Merrill who many readers may have met in the first book in this series, Apparition Lake. As in that book the reader will find Ranger Merril dealing with some alarming events around Yellowstone. The problem is these events are not just the threat from environmentalists, or campers’ causing mayhem, but something is brewing under the ground. There are earth tremors that bring signs that maybe the long dormant volcano under their feet is becoming active. There of course are the unexplained deaths that claim not just animals, but that of tourists and a ranger.

I wish to add that the book opening is quite interesting as well as it sets up some great foreshadowing of what may come. The Lamoreux brothers do a great job taking the reader back to a different time as we find the young Arapaho medicine man, Nakos, on a vision quest. The events that take place during this question and what will follow a few hundred years later will become clearer as you follow the story.

The thing is all the mystery around the park will eventually become tied to a mysterious box that is found within the park. I will not go into much detail on how, or where it is found, but just say they did have to look under something to find it. The item in that box will get things moving very fast within the pages of the book. These events will lead Ranger Merrill to search out his Shoshone friend, Johnny Two Ravens.  Along with Johnny, Merrill will also end up realizing he will need the help of a young professor of Seismology, one Dr. Betty Chmielewski or Lew for short.

The book is well written as the brothers certainly know how to work together and develop their characters. Along with the characters it does appear they have done a lot of research on Yellowstone and the history around the National Park. The book does have some violent acts, but for the most part we read more about the aftermath then get to read about the full details. I for one love this type of storytelling when it comes to violence as it engages the brain even more. The best thing about the additional engagement of the brain is it brings you more and more into the story you are reading.

Obsidian Tears is a very well written book and truly fits as book 2 in the Apparition Lake series. The reader gets to catch up on what has happened in the life of those characters they may have enjoyed from the first book. You also get a sense of what is going on within a park of Yellowstone’s size from the daily patrols that take place to dealing with some of the visitors. This is what makes not just the drama of the main story so special but you get a sense of the happenings at the park, which draws you in even more. A truly enjoyable read and I’m sure like many others, I hope for more.

 
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Posted by on January 29, 2018 in Reviews

 

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Seven for the Slab by Doug Lamoreux

There where comic books, radio programs and television shows that would give their audience short scary stories. These would often wrap up quickly and would allow the presenter to do an anthology of sorts as they could have several stories within the same production. These of course helped give birth to the numerous anthologies that can be found out there.  We can also get a sense of this style from the 20007 Horror film “Trick ‘r Treat”.

Author Doug Lamoreux takes this idea and does two better than the before mentioned film as he places seven stories within the pages of his novella. This novella is aptly titled, “Seven for the Slab”.  I’m sure many who see the title will draw the conclusion that the slab must be in reference to a funeral home. I will say that assumption would be very correct, but do not go thinking these stories take place in one.  In the contrary a funeral home does have some of the main story thread but it’s not all the reader will get out of the pages of the novella.

Seven for the Slab starts out with the one thing so many of dislike, and that is being awoken by a ringing telephone. If you ask me that in itself is a nightmare as you never know why someone is calling you so late and if you are about to get heartbreaking news. This phone call is one that brings good news for one Herb Flay, it would mean he had his job back and that the Fengriffen Funeral Home and Crematorium needed his services. It was a call he had been waiting on for what seemed like a month and with some odd glee he went out into the thunderstorm ready to do his job.

This is the setup to the novella as Flay heads out in the night to meet his boss at a home of not one but two deceased individuals, a brother and a sister. The scene is a small neighboring town and as Flay heads out to the scene we are introduced to a group of characters from firemen, EMTS, local police and a home owner.

The rain along with what is found at the home of the deceased brother and sister are what send many of the first responders to a home owner’s garage. The place becomes the official staging area for those involved to wait out the rain and their potential next assignment if something comes up. This is a welcoming option for those who had been in the home, as the bodies, well it’s amazing what can happen after a period of time. I’m leaving the details for the story itself as for some it could be slightly disturbing, but sadly it is part of life.

I’ve provided a bit of the background on why there are so many within this garage as this is where a push from one of those individuals will get the stories moving. One must realize that when you have so many first responders together they may have stories to share with each other. In this instance it is just that, they are all challenged to share a story that will fit their current settings. It is a chance for each of them to out-do the other as they tell their stores.

I could go into each story but as this is a novella I do not want to take away a readers opportunity to really enjoy them. I just will say that with each one they get a bit more thought provoking and there is a bit of everything involved. The reader will find aliens, ghosts, zombie like creatures, and the worse of all humanity. I say this as what man can do to their fellow man can be just as gruesome as the creatures that we see in our dreams.

Seven for the Slab shows off the creative mind of author Doug Lamoreux as his characters tell their stories. They are well crafted stories that will have you wondering not just about the character writing the stories but that of the author who wrote the novella. I must say that you can tell he was a fan of those old series like Vault of Horror and Tales from the Crypt. The thing is we hear some great stories from the first responders but the back ground story is just as traumatic. I’ll close by saying that it is amazing what some will do to keep a job.

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2017 in Reviews

 

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When The Tik-Tik Sings by Doug Lamoreux

Tik-TikThere are book titles that when you see them you are not sure what you are going to get when you start to read. I have to say that the book, “When The Tik-Tik Sings”, is just such a title. I was thinking is this about some sort of demented coo-coo clock? There’s a chance that Tik-Tik could be a title of a singer or a band. I had no idea what I was getting into when I first saw the title. Author Doug Lamoreux has written some great books so I tossed away my guesses on potential subject and began to read.

The book opens with veteran police woman, Erin, talking her morning run. As she runs through the area and near the peak of Eagle Point Park she is startled by a big black shape. The shape jumps out and goes up scaring the officer so that she falls and lands rather undignified in the wet grass. Whatever the thing was she had heard this odd noise, “tik-tik, tik-tik, tik…” just before it appeared. She was rightfully nervous after being startled and her imagination start to run wild but she was able to re-focus and finish her run.

It’s not long after the run that she is in her patrol car and on her way to work. It’s here that she comes across a speeding car and a very reckless driver in an expensive sports car. She does her job and begins pursuit of the driver, and it’s not long before the chase ends. It’s at the moment that she is about to confront this driver that something unexpected happens. There is a loud scream and it’s followed not long after by an explosion.

The book takes off from this point like the big bang that startled many in this small tourist town in Iowa near the Mississippi River. The next few chapters are filled with action as we are introduced to firefighters and other local police. There are mixes of great sarcastic comments from one character to another. Firefighters Ben and Nestor are some of those characters that fill the reader with some of that great laughter that will be found as the fight those in authority.

Those upcoming chapters also will introduce everyone to what is going to become the scourge of the local police. This being multiple murders that make no real sense. A woman’s body found way up in the air on the top of an old theater. There will be a common thread for most of the murders, but to find out what those are you must read the book.

There is another item in the book I found fascinating and even spoke to some I know who live in the Philippines about. The fact is that Filipino myth and lore will play a large part of what is happening within the pages of the book. Those who live in the country will tell you that the country has many myths and stories and some of those come to live within the pages of the book. In my checks it is clear that author Doug Lamoreux did his homework as he is spot on with how he uses that lore within the book.

When The Tik-Tik Sings has nothing to do with a clock as I originally thought could be possible. The part that a bird may be involved is “somewhat” right but it wasn’t something I was thinking about. The book has non-stop turns of action and with the point of view form used within the pages it is hard to put down. There is a lot of violence but the great thing is that Lamoreux does not do anything to gratuitous. The violence fits the situation and the descriptions do make the imagination work a little as you read. The book will make fans of mystery, suspense and thrillers very happy and is worth the read and is published by Creativia Publishing.

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2015 in Reviews

 

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What’s coming in 2015 and Thank You 2014

ThankYouThe year of 2014 has been an exciting one as I was able to read over twenty books and post reviews on the blog.  The greatest thing is that often an author, or publisher, has reached out to me regarding their book. This to me is exciting and helps to show that I am reaching the right audience with the reviews.  The audience I refer to is those people who look for authors, publishers and books that often fly under the mainstream market place. My eyes, and then fingers, help put out a forum for their books and draw attention to their works through my reviews. The word reviews is used as I don’t just put them on my blog but cross post to Amazon and just recently all went up on Goodreads as well.

These individuals produce books that are just as engaging as a Stephen King,  Stephanie Myer, Suzanne Collins and other well-known authors.  They bring imagination to life which is what I believe many authors endeavor to do with their readers. The pages can be digital, or physical, but have the same effect no matter how you read. It is why I write this post as I want to thank those that helped my imagination over the past year. I hope my review helped other readers find their books and enjoy them as much as I have. This is the main reason on why I never say NO to a review request.

Before I start with listing and thanking those who gave me the great opportunity of discovering a new world through their prose let me share with you what I have coming for 2015.  As you will see the list is growing and it’s how I want it to be.

Upcoming in 2015 in no particular order:

 

  • Playback Effect by Karen A Wyle
  • Glimpses of the Undead by Julianne Snow
  • The Last Bucelarii (Book 1): Blade of the Destroyer by Andy Peloquin
  • Thunder Bay by Robert Reynolds
  • Why 319 by Mark Love
  • Counting Churches The Malta Stories by Rosanne Dingli

 

 

Now it’s time to thank those authors, and publishers, for the books I enjoyed over 2014. The list is in order of reviews from most recent to beginning of the year. If I missed anyone it was not on purpose but a MAJOR oversite on my part.

 THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR A GREAT 2014

 

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2014 in Reviews

 

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Congratulations to Author Doug Lamoreux on Movie Development

Draculas DemeterIt’s not every day that someone who reads a lot of independent authors gets to put a post such as this out. I’m thrilled that I can say I know Doug Lamoreux through the reviews of his books and just learned something awesome for the man.

Doug has the book Dracula’s Demeter that is being turned into a movie by Thunderball Films. Even better the development must be moving forward as there are now two women signed to be in the movie.

The actresses are listed as part of a post Doug shared on his Facebook page.

 

Doug’s Post is below:

Meet the ladies of Dracula’s Demeter! (link to promo video)

ThunderBall Films Lid. (London) and producer Brian L. Porter, and casting director Barbara French have officially signed the lovely and talented German actress Isabella Jantz, and the equally lovely and talented Scottish actress Vivien Taylor for the roles of Ekaterina Gabor and Mina Murray (Harker) in the film adaptation of my novel, Dracula’s Demeter, now in development at ThunderBall Films.

Both actresses will first appear in the new Brian L. Porter TV series, Jack the Ripper: Reality and Myth, now in production.

My thanks to ThunderBall CEO and Producer Mario Domina, my publisher, Miika Hannila, at Creativia‬ Publishing, producer / co-writer Brian L. Porter, and Barbara French for their incredible efforts. And my very best wishes for all success with Jack the Ripper: Reality and Myth.

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2014 in Personal

 

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