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Water to Water Character Interview Kititit (Weesah)

The below is a character interview from the book Water to Water written by Author Karen A Wyle. Please enjoy the insight into on of the characters minds from her book.

{Note Kititit is a Weesah and a peddler who befriends Terrill and Honnu}

Q. How did you become a peddler

A. Well, now. That’s a ways to think back . . . . When I was a young sprout, we had a neighbor who was a peddler, wagon and all. I thought her wagon was about the prettiest thing I’d ever seen, all painted up as it was. And she used to let me help load the goods in the back – leastways, helping is what she called it. Getting in the way is what I’d call it, remembering. And when she’d been away and came home again, she always had stories to tell about the places she’d been. I’d never been anywhere, and I got to hankering after a life like she had.

 

Q. Your wagon – did it used to be your neighbor’s?

A. Right you are! Though by the time she figured she was ready to stay home and play with her grandchildren and take it easy, the wagon was what you might call used up – the canopy, anyway. My folks gave me a new one, and I picked what to paint on it.

 

Q. You have a mate and children, I hear. How have you managed to strike a balance between traveling and family life?

A. Well, I don’t have just any mate. I made sure to find a lady as liked to hear stories. I promised to always bring back plenty of stories. And she’s an independent sort – doesn’t need someone at her elbow all the time, telling her how to do things. A mate as hung around every day might get annoying for such as her. So we suit each other. And the longer I’m away, the longer I stay home and do my bit with the young ‘uns and the beasts and the garden and all. And now that some of our young ‘uns are grown, she has plenty of help when she needs it.

 

Q. You’re acquainted with Terrill and Honnu, I believe. How did that come about?

A. I’ve known Honnu a good piece of his life, I’d say. I visit a few different fisher villages, and he lives – or lived, I’m not sure which is right just now – in one of ‘em. I was the first Weesah he ever saw, I reckon, and how he would stare! Anyhow, he’s a curious fellow and always likes to hear my traveler’s tales.

 

Q. That brings up an interesting point. Aren’t you somewhat given to exaggeration in those tales of yours? Should Honnu believe everything you say?

A. (laughs) No, I can’t say as he should. But I reckon he knows that. Now, I wouldn’t say he knows just what to believe and what not to. But if he ever asked me, serious-like, I’d tell him.

 

Q. And Terrill? How did you meet him?

A. That was luck, if luck is something that happens, as to which I’ve no firm opinion. His da took ill, and Terrill was one of the funeral party as took him to the sea. I left Honnu’s village about the time they left to head home again, and we got to talking on the road. A nice young fellow. On the serious side, and tending to worry more than is comfortable for a youngster his age. I did my bit to cheer him up, when I could.

 

Q. And how did Terrill and Honnu meet each other?

A. (chuckles) Well, I’ll maybe let you ask one of them about that. I’d best be packing up and heading on, pretty soon. Any last questions? Or might you be wanting something from the wagon before I go? I’ve got some good knives I picked up a few towns back. Or if you’ve little ones at home, I have toys — balls for juggling, and these dolls. See the bits of shell that make up the armor? And of course, I have fish. Always plenty of fish.

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Posted by on November 4, 2018 in Interview

 

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Water to Water Character Interview Terrill (Vushu)

The below is a character interview from the book Water to Water written by Author Karen A Wyle. Please enjoy the insight into on of the characters minds from her book.

 

[NOTE: Terrill is a Vushlu. He would have become an adult next year by taking a ritual first journey to the ocean with other Vushla his age. Instead, he attained adult status prematurely, accompanying his dying father to the ocean, where his father went into the water to be dissolved.

 

Interviewing Terrill is a tricky task. As the book begins, he is understandably morose. Later, when he is less so, he has good reasons not to reveal his activities and concerns. I’ve dealt with this dilemma by splitting his interview into two, and working within the limitations Terrill sets.

 

The first interview takes place at a rest stop during the funeral party’s return trip. Terrill speaks in a quiet monotone most of the time.]

Q. I’m very sorry about your father.

A. Thank you.

 

Q. It will take you quite a while to get home. How are you occupying yourself along the way?

A. I’m trying to remember as much as I can about Da. [a pause; he clenches and armors his fists] But the things I remember keep reminding me of things I don’t know. Questions I never asked, and never can, now. [long pause]

 

Q. Have you found any ways to keep your spirits up?

A. There’s a Weesah peddler who’s been traveling alongside us. He likes to tell stories. When I listen to them, it takes my mind off . . . other things. I’ve even laughed a few times. [glances to the side] Not that my uncle approves. Of the listening or the laughing.

[An older Vushlu approaches; the interview concludes]

———–

[The second interview takes place around three months (or the equivalent) later. Terrill is now traveling in the peddler’s wagon, as is Honnu, another Vushlu about his age.]

Q. Is this where you expected to be, at this time?

A. No. Nothing about what I’m doing these days is as I expected. One unpredictable event has led to another.

 

Q. What can you tell me about these events?

A. [a slight smile – which for Vushla means a rounded mouth] Very little, I’m afraid. Except that one of our funeral party, my aunt, became very ill on the way home. The others returned to the sea with her. I [a short pause] chose not to. That led to my becoming better acquainted with Honnu. And that led to everything else.

 

Q. So do you think you’ll become a peddler?

A. [another smile] I don’t think so. But for now, I’m a peddler’s assistant and have my duties. I’d better go.

 

Q. Perhaps we’ll meet again along the road.

A. I . . . don’t think that is very likely. But stranger things have happened. [a quiet chuckle] Indeed they have.

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2018 in Interview

 

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Water to Water Character Interview Honnu (Vushu)

The below is a character interview from the book Water to Water written by Author Karen A Wyle. Please enjoy the insight into on of the characters minds from her book.

 

[NOTE: Honnu is a young Vushlu. His family are fisher folk and live by the sea. This interview takes place around the time the story begins, on the beach, in late afternoon. Honnu is cleaning a fishing boat.]

 

Q. Hello. I hope I’m not disturbing –

A. Watch out! I’m using seawater here.

 

Q. It’s splashing all over you. Isn’t that a problem?

A. Not with this suit on. [He gestures along his body.] It’ll keep the water out for years and years yet.

 

Q. Do you have such suits for visitors? For rent, perhaps?

A. Sorry, no. They take a long time to make. We only get them when we’re done growing, and then we keep them for a long time. Let me just finish up here, and we can talk.

[a few minutes later]

All done! I have a few minutes before I go do chores.

 

Q. I gather you fish for a living.

A. That’s right.

 

Q. Do you like it?

A. [a slight pause] Pretty well. I like working with other people. More when they appreciate my help, which they mostly do. Of course, I like it better some days than others. In hot season, it’s cooler out on the water than on land – though the suit does make me warmer than I’d be otherwise. Cold season, that can get, well, cold, suit or no suit. And I get pretty tired by the end of the day. But it’s better than being bored. [another pause] Not that I’m never bored.

 

Q. Do you picture yourself doing anything different, later in your life?

A. [scuffs a hind foot in the sand] I’d like to see more of the world, someday, somehow. I hear stories – mainly from the Weesah peddler who comes here – and I want to see for myself whether they’re true, and what other stories might be out there waiting to be found.

[someone calls Honnu’s name from a nearby dwelling]

I’d better go. Chores, like I said. It was nice talking to you. If you want to come with me, you could maybe stay for dinner. The peddler brought sausages, and we’ll be having a campfire.

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2018 in Interview

 

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Ten +1 Questions with Author Karen A Wyle

I first wish to thank Author Karen A Wyle for taking time to answer the Ten +1 Questions regarding her recent release, “Water to Water“.  You will find information below on her world building, to her writing process and inspirations. I do hope you enjoy her responses as much as I did.

 

Question 1: When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

–I don’t know for sure, but I know it happened by the time I was 10 years old. At that age, it was my ambition to be the youngest published novelist ever. I was quite irked to find out that a 9-year-old girl in the UK had beaten me to it.

 

Question 2: What inspired you to write Water to Water?

–It was almost November 2017, and therefore time to get ready for the 2017 National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo or NaNo for short). I had various possible ideas saved in a folder — and then I had a dream with the image that opens the book, a Vushlu meeting the sea in its final moments. The idea grabbed me by the imagination, and I went with it.

 

Question 3: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters? 

–I spent the first few days before NaNo 2017, and the first few days of NaNo, brainstorming ideas for scenes and characters. My husband contributed a key plot point.

 

Question 4: Where do you get the ideas for the worlds you find yourself creating?

–I’ve been reading science fiction for decades, which has no doubt fertilized my world building faculties. A great deal of the writing, whether world building or any other aspect of it, happens on a subconscious level.

 

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books? 

–I’m glad you asked for some, since I can’t possibly remember them all: C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia; Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and A Secret Garden; Edward Eager’s Half Magic, Knight’s Castle, Magic by the Lake, and Magic or Not?; Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series; P. L. Travers’s Mary Poppins series; Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series; and Hilda Lewis’s The Ship That Flew.

 

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book?

–It’s a thrill every time. I grin ear to ear and bounce on my toes.

 

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre? 

For NaNo 2018, I’m heading in quite a different direction, or rather, two of ’em. I’m about to start the rough draft of a romance novel set in the 19th century American West.

 

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book?

–For my novels up until now, I imagine most of them being people who love to read in general and also know and love science fiction.

 

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book?

While it isn’t the right process for everyone, NaNo can be a terrific way to get over hesitation and self-doubt and just get started. It’s also ideal for finishing a rough draft, as opposed to constantly editing and re-editing the beginning of one. The supportive online community at https://nanowrimo.org/ can help a new author make it through.

 

Question 10: When not writing how does you like to spend your time?

–Reading! I read whenever I’m not doing something that makes it impossible. I also like taking photographs, but haven’t done as much of that in recent years. I also like walking in pretty places and watching a few (not many) TV series. I don’t get to travel very much, but enjoy it when the logistics aren’t too annoying.

 

The + 1 Question

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why? 

  –At the moment, it would be Boston, MA, because my younger daughter lives there. More generally: London. I’d want the tour to include Hatchards, Primrose Hill Books, and Lutyens & Rubinstein.

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2018 in Interview

 

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Ten +1 Questions with Author S.T. Campitelli

Readers and visitors,

Below you will find the answer to the Ten +1 Questions I do ask many authors to answer after I read their books. S.T. Campitelli is next in the list of Authors to put hands to a keyboard to answer those questions. I do hope you find his answers as interesting as I did.

Question 1: When did you realize first wanted to be a writer?

I have wanted to write for the longest time and have always had a strong interest in end-of-the-world stories, so I felt that if I ever got the story I wanted to tell, I would do it. For a long time I couldn’t really bring together a coherent sense of a story line, so although I wanted to write I didn’t really have a story. Once the elements for The Fall fell into place, story-wise, I thought, ‘Hey! Let’s do this!’.

Question 2:  How did your friends/family take the loss of your time as you wrote the book?

That hasn’t been an issue. I try to work a lot in hours where it doesn’t impact my family/friends, so, early mornings, lunchtimes at work, perhaps down times at night when the family is doing other stuff.

Question 3: What inspired you to write The Fall: Book 1 – Conversion?

This may come up in a few answers to these questions, but the whole post-apocalyptic genre has always fascinated me. I grew up in the 70s when the cinema had some brilliant major post-apoc movies on – Planet of The Apes, Soylent Green, Omega Man, Rollerball – those movies were absolutely compelling for me, but the one that blew the doors off, so to speak, was Mad Max 2, The Road Warrior, which just coalesced perfectly all the images of what a post-apocalyptic world looks like for me – the wasteland, the characters, the costumes, the hero and antagonists, and of course the cars. Brilliant. I tried to capture some of that vibe in The Fall, but I didn’t want it to just be another Mad Max type story, it had to be my own, so it is quite different.

Question 4: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters? 

I have this interest in the idea of the isolated holdout – places in times of war or situations where there is an island of safety or sanity in a lost world, so the idea of the walled compounds, the ‘wallcoms’ was an early idea – a sanctuary in a sea of danger. A completely separate idea I had was that by that time, mid-21st century, our personal comms would be embedded in us, we wouldn’t carry smartphones anymore, they would be a part of us and that became the 360 concept. Somehow they then came together and became the base elements of The Fall. I wanted to have nuanced characters that weren’t usual and I have worked in the university system for 20+ years., so made John Bradley and academic, a hero who isn’t an ‘obvious’ hero, plus the antagonists the Headhunter, as I  have always been compelled by that intelligent-gentleman baddie, and the Alpha Kronenburg, the ex-policeman who we follow as an infected being. The inspirations for these characters didn’t really come from any one in particular but rather have shades of inspirations.

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books? 

I read a lot of fantasy growing up and two big influences were Tolkien’s LOTR and Stephen Donaldson’s Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Along with Game of Thrones a bit later, they perhaps gave me that love of the character-driven, big story arc. Later with more post-apoc stuff, Justin Cronin’s The Passage trilogy was just brilliant and Blake Crouch’s The Last Town were very both influential for me.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book?

Great question. Umm, accomplishment, relief, very happy that I’d done it. A little bit of a feeling of ‘loss’, you get close to the book, it’s fun, it’s an adventure and it feels like it’s over in a sense. Until book 2 …

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre? 

Yes, book 2 of The Fall, Reversion, is being written now.  

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book?

Some of the material is a bit confronting and vivid, so it’s not a young readers’ book, by any stretch, but I think 16 and up would be good with it. Anyone who likes any elements of action, adventure, post-apocalypse, SF, military – it has those things. But then again, I’ve had people say to me, ‘I don’t generally go for this type of story, but I loved this!’ So, I hope it could have a wide appeal.

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book?

Do it. Give it a go, but you must be open to growth, feedback and change. It’s not easy, it can be frustrating, but incredibly rewarding. I love doing it, writing, and if it is something you are drawn to then give it a go.

Question 10: When not writing how does you like to spend your time?

Reading, movies – addicted to both. Netflix doesn’t help.

 

The + 1 Question 

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why? 

Europe. Haven’t been there yet. Been to Japan multiple times and many other parts of Asia and the States, but yet to get to Europe. So, if someone wants to sponsor me for a book tour, get in touch!

Below are a few Links of Interest:

 

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2018 in Interview

 

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Ten Plus One Questions with Author Jessica A. Scott

Jessica ScottI have to say that it is always a bit humbling when an author reaches out to you for a book review. This is what Jessica A Scott did and I have to say I’ve enjoyed working with her when it came to her book and the questions below. I got a sense of the author through the may post it notes behind her in the author photo on the page. Those notes combined with the honest answers below make me hope there will be a lot more coming from the author. So please enjoy the answers to those Ten Plus One Questions.

Question 1: When did you realize first wanted to be a writer?

I think I have always wanted to be a writer. I’d been making up stories since I was old enough to think, and as soon as my mom taught me to read and write when I was three years old, I knew that’s how I wanted to spend my time. My stories got better and more complex over time, of course, but I’ve always known that writing was what I wanted to do with my life.

Question 2:  How did your friends/family take the loss of your time as you wrote the book?

Honestly, I don’t think they minded too much. I’m sure that my parents would have preferred that I do something that paid more (haha), but they were/are still very supportive of me and my pursuit of my dream, so I don’t think the loss of my time was much of an issue for anyone, especially since I’m able to balance writing with friends and family time fairly well.

Question 3: What inspired you to write Chase and Charlie?

I know this is a cliché in the writing business, but for this book, the idea came to me in a dream I had years ago. The dream itself was really strange (like most of my dreams are), but it gave me a general idea and the main character, who I instantly fell in love with and just HAD to write about. I think when a story idea comes to me in a dream, it makes me want to write it more, since it feels more real to me. It makes me feel like I myself have lived at least a part of it, or have met the characters before!

Question 4: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters? 

Well, like I mentioned, I got the idea for the plot and the characters Chase and Charlie from a dream, but the story itself really began to develop on its own once I started writing it. Charlie, the main character/narrator, is a little bit like me, and a little bit better and more courageous and funny than me, and I feel like she just sort of wrote her own story. I just held the pen!

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books? 

I’m not sure if her books really inspired mine, since they are so different, but J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series was always my favorite as a kid, because I was always amazed by how she had created an entire world for her and her characters, complete with different languages, names, and ideas that no one else had really put together before. I wanted to be able to do that, and do that in a way that seemed real to the reader, and to me.

I also read a lot of Dean Koontz books, even as a child, and I was (and still am) inspired by the way he took somewhat unbelievable or fantastical events and made them seem like something that could really happen. I am a huge fan of realistic fiction, and that is what I strive to write.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book?

This is a good question! Honestly, I was kind of in shock when I first held the printed, paper copy of my book in my hand. It seemed so bizarre to me to read my own words, that I’d only seen on notebook paper and on my computer screen, inside of a real, honest-to-goodness, published book! (Which looks pretty great, thanks to my best friend and cover artist Sarah Hance.) I still don’t know if I quite believe it really happened… haha!

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre? 

Of course I continue to write! Even if I never had anything published, or never have any commercial success, I will still continue to write, because that is my passion. My main genre focus is still thriller/romantic suspense, but I am experimenting with some different genres lately, such as the mystery and crime genres. I think it is a good thing to try different genres from time to time—it is a good exercise for your creativity!

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book?

The characters in Chase and Charlie are sort of a “young twenty-something,” so I think that people in that age group would enjoy it, as would teenagers. There really isn’t anything too offensive in it, so I think that it could be read by anyone who likes suspense, regardless of age. I think young women especially would enjoy it, because it is always good for us to read a book about a strong, self-possessed, relatable female character who really gets things done.

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book?

Yes, I have two suggestions, actually. First: NEVER GIVE UP!! Writing a book is hard, and it takes a lot of work, but mostly it takes perseverance. There will be days when you feel like you don’t connect with your characters, or days when you feel like you just don’t want to write anymore, but you can’t give up. Writing is something you have to do for you, not for anyone else, so you have to keep at it until you make yourself proud.

Secondly, I would suggest reading a book called On Writing by Stephen King. This is the best book about writing I have ever read, and it helped me a lot when I was experiencing writer’s block on a recent book. On Writing not only gives you a lot of great tips and advice about writing and how to improve your process, it also lets you see how a successful author like Stephen King became a successful author like Stephen King. Most importantly, though, it gives writers hope. As King himself says, “writing is a lonely job,” and it is really great to hear stories and advice from someone (a surprisingly relatable someone!) who has been there before, and who understands what being an author is really like.

Question 10: When not writing how do you like to spend your time?

When I’m not writing, I like to read, which actually helps a lot with the writing, so I’m not sure that counts. I also like to watch old movies and tv shows, like Chase and Charlie do in my novel (Maybe that’s where they get it from!). Writing is always my favorite thing to do though, so usually when I’m not writing, I’m thinking about writing!

The + 1 Question

If your book got turned into a movie do you have any actors/actresses you’d like to see play your characters?

Hmm… that’s a tough one. I’m not sure who I’d like to play Chase or Hoagie, but I could definitely see Jennifer Lawrence playing Charlie. They both have a lot of spunk and a great sense of humor toward life, and I feel like Lawrence would really capture Charlie’s lighthearted, “never say die” attitude.

Where to find Jessica online

 

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2015 in Interview

 

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Ten Plus One Questions with Author Andy Peloquin

Author AnAndy Peloquindy Peloquin is one of those men that seems to have been writing his entire life. You will get a sense in that just from the first answer to the questions below. He is the man who brought us the great book Blade of the Destroyer and has written about 8,000 articles. To think he’s only in his 20’s says a lot about his dedication. So see how he answers the questions below.

 

Question 1: When did you realize first wanted to be a writer?

I discovered my talent for writing around the age of 10 or 11. I had a teacher who was passionate about science and literature. His love of reading and writing rubbed off on me, and I have been writing ever since.

I write off and on until the age of 19 or 20, when I took a five-year hiatus. I published my very first book in March 2014, and I’ve been addicted to creating ever since!

Question 2:  How did your friends/family take the loss of your time as you wrote the book?

My wife was very supportive–and still is to this day. I spent a lot of my Christmas/New Year holiday writing, and seeing as she was working (from home, thank the gods!), it wasn’t a big problem. As for how my kids take it, you’ll have to ask them. I know there are times when they wish I wasn’t working (so I could drive them places), but so far it hasn’t been a huge problem.

Question 3: What inspired you to write Blade of the Destroyer?

After reading books by Joe Abercrombie, Brent Weeks, and Scott Lynch, I fell in love with anti-heroes and the darker underbelly of fantasy societies. I’ve always loved stories about assassins, thieves, and rogues, and it just felt natural to write one myself. There just aren’t enough good fantasy assassin stories!

Question 4: During the initial writing process where did you get the idea for the book and its characters?

The idea came to me in stages:

The creation of the “legendary assassin” started out as a short piece of prose I wrote years ago. In the piece, a terrified man tries to escape a monster hunting him. It’s this inexorable, implacable creature that kills him in the end.

When I started writing in 2013, I read over some of my older works and found that piece. The story just kind of grew from there–with the monster becoming a half-demon assassin. He is still implacable and inexorable, but more man and less monster.

Question 5: Who were some of the authors that inspired you as a child growing up and their books?

My favorite birthday gift to this day is still “The Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes”. I read that book so many times before I had to give it away. Edgar Rice Burroughs’ John Carter series got me hooked on science fiction and fantasy.

Question 6: What was the feeling like when you saw the first completed version of your book?

It was such a dream come true. To feel the pages turn in my hands, to see the AMAZING cover (done by my ultra-talented sister), and to inhale that “new book” smell–it was awesome. Even now, days later, I can’t stop smiling every time I see it on my desk or see my kids reading it.

Question 7: Do you continue to write and in what genre?

I’m going to stick with dark fantasy for now. I love to explore the darker depths of human nature, so my books will be more focused on what monsters people are, rather than real monsters.

Question 8: Who do you imagine being the people reading your book?

Anyone who is interested in a gripping character, an intriguing story, and a bit of darkness. Epic fantasy readers may not like my less-than-happy endings, but I think they’ll be satisfied with them. The story is a rich, vivid, and graphic one that will paint a VERY clear picture in the readers’ heads. Definitely worth picking up!

Question 9: Any good suggestions for those who want to try writing their own book?

Be prepared for A LOT of hard work. It’s amazingly fun to write that story, but that’s all the fun you get. From there, it’s hard work re-drafting, editing, implementing critiques and feedback from beta readers, and more. But it will all be worth it when you have a finished product you can be proud of.

Question 10: When not writing how do you like to spend your time?

I’m a HUGE comic book geek, and I stay pretty up to date with the latest from the Marvel Universe. I also watch TV, hit the gym, read, spend time with my kids, and play video games. I’m a down to earth kind of guy!

The + 1 Question

If you had any one place in the world you could travel to for a book tour, where would that place be, and why?

I would LOVE to go back to Japan on a book tour. I was born and raised there, leaving at the age of 14, and it would be wonderful to visit. I plan to do so at some point in my life, but being able to have an all-expenses-paid trip for a book tour would be twice the AWESOME.

 

Where to find him online:

Andy Peloquin

LinkedIn

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Facebook

Twitter

 
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Posted by on September 2, 2015 in Interview

 

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